Guest Post: From Film to Flipbook to Film

Boxeurs (1896-98), one of Georges Méliès's films rediscovered in flipbooks

Howard Curle recently called my attention to an interesting on-line presentation posted by the San Francisco Silent Film Festival about a number of early films, many by Georges Méliès, which have been reconstituted from flipbooks from the late 1800s in which a series of photos printed from the films create a simulation of cinematic movement. In this guest post, Howard provides an introduction to this fascinating discovery.

Recent miscellaneous viewing, part two

Charles Bronson as real-life career criminal Joe Valachi in Terence Young's The Valachi Papers (1972)

More random viewing: two obscure independent films from the BFI, Margaret Tait’s poetic Blue Black Permanent (1992) and Maurice Hatton’s gritty fake-umentary about the film business, Long Shot (1977); and three from Twilight Time – George Sluizer’s interesting Americanization of his existential thriller The Vanishing (1993), Terrence Young’s straightforward fact-based crime saga The Valachi Papers (1972), and D.W. Griffith’s monumental but deeply troubling Birth of a Nation (1915).

Blasts from the past

Holiday viewing

The Magic Kingdom

Recent disks from England: Arrow Video, part one

Vinegar Syndrome summer binge, part one

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